Gift Ideas: Adult Easter Basket

I don’t know how you were raised, but in my household, Easter baskets were primarily filled with candy and maybe a few springtime fun items (bubbles, sidewalk chalk) and 1-2 “big ticket” items (and by big ticket, I mean $10-$20 MAX). Nowadays, I see kids getting bikes or scooters for Easter gifts (if that’s how you roll, more power to you).

Anyway, a few years ago, my sisters and I started a tradition of putting together an Easter basket for my mom and step-dad. My mom does all sorts of fun Easter things for the kids in our family (and for us), so we figured this is a fun way to treat her in return. We all go in together to compose the basket, so it only comes out to about $15-$20/person, but you could easily simplify the list of items you include to keep it on the more “cost effective” end depending on your target spend.

Here’s what we included this year:

  • Healthy snacks – both my mom and step-dad are or have recently been watching their figures, and in general, want to eat healthier, so we included a variety of “better for you” treats, including:
    • Nut packs: we picked up individual packs of cashews, pistachios and almonds (funny story: we each bought one of these packs and coincidentally ALL bought the same brand…aren’t we cute…)
    • FiberNow Cinnamon Coffee Cakes: these little delights are great for when you need a fiber boost and come in at only 90 calories, which isn’t bad when you’re looking for a sweet fix; I get this off-brand from Aldi and they also do a really nice chocolate brownie and lemon bar
    • Whisks Parmesan Cheese Crisps: my sister got these as salad toppers for one of our family gatherings and my mom absolutely RAVED about them, so we figured it’d be fun to include
    • Skinny pop: there are lots of flavors of this or the Boom Chicka Pop or the Simply Nature Sea Salted Popcorn (Aldi) that you can choose from; they even have poppable bags now!
  • Fun drinks – my mom used to always include a 20 oz. bottle of pop in our Easter baskets since this was a “treat” we didn’t typically get; since neither are pop drinkers, we included:
    • Mini wine bottles: my mom is a sweet white drinker and my step-dad is more into dry reds, so we got the mini 4-packs from Target in each flavor; this also helps them with portion control to not overdrink their calories – much easier to open one of these for a glass than open a bottle and feel like you should drink the whole thing in one evening.
    • Moose Munch Coffee: this is my mom’s FAVORITE coffee, but is definitely on the more expensive side (best bet is to buy from Harry & David), so we try to get this for her every year
    • Major Dickason’s K-Cups: these are my step-dad’s preferred k-cups, but he tends not to buy them because they’re a little more pricey, so again, a nice little treat (plus then they both get some of their favorite coffee to enjoy)
  • Big ticket items – usually we try to come up with some “thing” that either they can both enjoy, or a bigger ticket non-food item for both of them. This year, we were light on ideas, but included the following:
    • EnerGel Pens: my husband actually bought these on impulse as they are my mom’s favorite (they weren’t in the original plan)
    • 3-wick Bath & Body Works Candle: you can’t really see it in the picture, but it’s there! We get one of these EVERY YEAR for my mom because she loves them. And, technically it IS for both of them since it makes their house smell nice.
    • Mini hand lotion from Bath & Body Works: this was an impulse add – I had a coupon for a free item, so why not get a little bottle of creamy lotion in her favorite summer scent?!

And that’s it! What I recommend for you is to do some brainstorming within the above categories to build your own Adult Easter basket:

  • What snacks / candy does the recipient love? (think about including both salty AND sweet)
  • What drinks could I include?
  • What other $10-$15 gifts could I throw in? (Note, gift cards are always an easy idea for this and stores may even have cute Easter themed-cards too!)

And, finally, I snagged the basket, which is MASSIVE, from Target for only $5 (they have TONS of options right now).

The final countdown is on – you have 1 week until Easter, so you better get your baskets ready. Happy basket building!

Gift Ideas: Nursing / Pumping Basket

I (semi-recently) learned that I’m pregnant with my first child. That probably means you’re about to start seeing a lot of baby-related posts on here, but I’ll try to keep it under control.

Today is all about a gift idea for someone else though (but not a bad idea to build this for yourself if you’re also expecting/a new mom). My SIL is 10 weeks ahead of me in her 3rd pregnancy. Since it’s #3, she’s not having a shower, but I still wanted to give her a gift as she’s about to undertake a massive task – bringing another human into the world.

We’ve been talking a lot about pumping / breastfeeding, so I decided, why not put together a little pumping / nursing basket for her.

Here are the essentials I included:

  • Drink bottle – apparently nursing makes you incredibly thirsty (note, I didn’t get a water bottle, but rather got a bottle that can be used for hot OR cold beverages, has a straw and also is spill-proof); I’m thinking about customizing it with my cricut, but not sure what I want to put on it. Leave any ideas in the comments!
  • Healthy snacks – when you’re sitting there pouring yourself into another human, or into a baggie, I guess you get hungry. I included some healthier, low calorie snacks including:
    • Bentons breakfast biscuit bites (chocolate) – Belvita knockoff from Aldi
    • FiberNow coffee cake brownies – FiberOne knockoff from Aldi
    • Simply Nature Sea Salted Popcorn – Smartfood knockoff from Aldi
    • Pretzel Slims (Everything flavor) – you guessed it – knockoff brand from Aldi
  • Diapers – in case you need one before or after your feeding
  • Wipes – see above
  • A onesie – in case of emergency / blowout
  • Tissues – just a nice-to-have for a variety of reasons
  • Nipple pads – things may get a little leaky on the not-in-use side
  • Nipple cream – well, because your nips are about to go through it…

All in all, a useful little basket that is thoughtful and more focused on mom. So often we go all out buying clothes and toys and things for the tiny human when there is a new baby on the way and we forget all about treating the adult humans who will care for them!

Hope you found this useful. Let me know what other essentials I may have missed in my basket in the comments.

Take A Trip: Moab, UT

You might be saying to yourself – hmmmm….never heard of such a place. Well, if you’re not into heat, outdoor activities and the wonders of nature, then this place is NOT for you. If you are, keep reading.

Moab is known for many things:

  1. Biking
  2. National & State Parks
  3. Canyoneering
  4. Hiking
  5. River rafting
  6. ATV riding / 4×4 driving

Basically, it’s the middle of the desert with not much around. It’s not particularly close to any major airports, although it does have a tiny regional airport (where you can pick up a skydiving adventure). It’s about a 4-hour drive from Salt Lake City and 6 hours from Denver (this drive is INCREDIBLE).

My husband and I are avid bikers, so we decided to head out and try our hand at some proper mountain biking. Here’s what we did.

Getting There

  • We were flying in from the midwest, so we had a choice – SLC or DEN. We opted for Denver (we’d previously gone mountain biking there and really liked the city) so we could spend a night there before making the drive out. Flight options were also better and cheaper going there, which was a pretty decent factor in our decision.
  • We rented a car in the city and hit the road; make sure wherever you rent from is okay with you taking the car across state lines – if not, you could get into hot water if something was to go wrong while you’re in UT.
  • The drive was ~6 hours, but super worth it. You go through incredible mountains, get to drive by Aspen and really just enjoy the scenic ride following the Colorado River for a decent portion of the trip. It’s almost a trip before your trip. Highly recommend renting an SUV for this, though. We went at the end of May and STILL encountered a pretty crazy whiteout snowstorm on our return back to Denver. We were thankful to have an AWD vehicle for this (and it’s nice for having in Moab as well).
  • Other tips to think about:
    • Download your driving directions / map before you hit the road, along with a decent playlist (or go old school with CDs). Going through the mountains, it’s highly likely you could lose cell service.
    • Be sure to bring snacks along for your trip. This is obvious for any road trip, but at various points along the way, it’s slim pickins for food.
    • Fill up at a stop OUTSIDE OF Moab before you get there. We made the mistake of not doing this and decided to get gas right before we got on the road to head back and we paid an arm and a leg at the only (and sketchiest) gas station available.
    • Bring all your essentials. There are obviously stores and everything you need in Moab, but prices are premium since it’s the middle of nowhere.

Lodging

  • We opted for a tiny house (this one); there are actually a few of these in the little trailer park we stayed in. It was the perfect size for the hubs and me. It had a full kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and living room. This was great because we didn’t want to eat out for every meal being there for almost a week, so we hit the grocery store on day 1 to stock up for house snacks, lunches, etc.
    • TIP: Bring a box of ziploc bags and a lunchbox or small cooler with you. This was AWESOME for packing lunches to take on the trail with us and have mid-ride. It meant we could spend more time in the parks while we were there without having to trek back off the trail to hit the snack shop or head out of the park to find food.
  • It’s also worth noting that our AirBNB host, Richard, was great. We had a totally dumb situation happen – the key to the house fell between the slats of the porch and we got locked out around 9pm. We called Richard and he had someone over within about 15 minutes to let us in and give us a new key.
  • There are tons of other options for lodging (a few hotels, hostels, other AirBNB rentals, etc.) or, if you’re feeling adventurous, you could even bring gear to pitch a tent for your trip or rent an RV. I think you may even be able to rent a yurt.

Things to Do

  • One of the first things we did was to rent hybrid bikes for our trip. There are a number of bike shops in Moab (due to the aforementioned claims to fame of the town), but we opted for Chile Pepper bike shop. They were super friendly and helpful. We even ended up setting up a trip transport with them for the end of our trip to get to the top of the epic Porcupine Rim trail and ride it down. Their prices were also reasonable AND we were even able to rent a bike rack from them to put on our rental. It was a great experience.
  • Moab also has some really cute shopping in the “downtown” area – there are lots of art galleries and handicraft shops you can check out. You don’t need a ton of time because it’s pretty small (maybe 10-15 shops, tops), but if you have an afternoon where you want to get out of the sun, it’s a great option.
  • Parks & trails – there are tons of options for all sorts of activities, but our focus was biking. Here’s where we went:
    • Dead Horse – this was probably my favorite park. They had a fantastic trail system that was clearly marked and easy to follow. It also had some really great rides and incredible views. Even on the drive into the park getting to the main parking and trailheads, there were tons of scenic stopping points to get a good look at the wonders of nature. The Colorado River runs through Dead Horse (it’s what caused the uniquely shaped cliffs) and it’s worth the trip to see it. It’s about a 40 minute drive to get there from Moab, but well worth it. However, definitely recommend you pack a lunch and make a day of it. Also, I’m pretty sure we had to pay $10-15 to get into Dead Horse for the day.
    • Klonzo Mountain Bike Area – this is about 35 minutes from Moab and a cool little trail system. There isn’t much else here (maybe some camping), but there are quite a few trails you can check out. What’s great about all the trail systems out there is that they’re labeled with skill level markers. If you aren’t up for expert level work (big drops, massive rocks to climb, uphill for miles), then you can choose an intermediate or easy path. One TIP for Klonzo – we couldn’t find a bathroom once we got there, so make sure to stop before you arrive…
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    • Moab Brands – this is the trail system that we returned to over and over again. I’m not sure it was our favorite, but it was really good and also super close to Moab. You actually pass it on your way in if you’re coming from the east. It’s only about a 10 minute drive on the main road/highway that leads into / out of the town. Unfortunately, this is also where I had a massive crash on our 2nd to last day that took me out of commission, but I wouldn’t not ride here. Just maybe would have been more careful crossing the cattle bridges 🙂
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    • Arches National Park – we didn’t spend a ton of time here. You can park and walk around and make a whole day of it. We chose to just drive around and see everything from the car, for the most part. The drive getting into the park is really cool – you go up and around a winding road. It’s also worth noting that you have to pay to get into Arches (I think $20) UNLESS you arrive after 4pm. Beware that it gets super busy during the day too, so you may sit in line to get into and around the park. We did park at one point to get out and see the famous Utah license plate arch, which was cool, but since we went here after my accident, my knee wasn’t feeling super great, so I wasn’t up to walking a ton.
    • Sky diving – this was a really cool experience that we decided to try for the first time while in Moab. There is a very small airport where you can tandem dive with an instructor. Since we were celebrating the hubs’ birthday, we went for it and had a great experience. I even still have the certificates hanging on my office wall. We jumped with Skydive Moab and the whole experience was easy and fun from start to finish. I jumped with Nick and he jumped with Adam and both guys were great. It really is breathtaking (quite literally) to see all the beautiful mountains and desert from that high up with absolutely no obstructions – just you and the air (oh, and a person on your back…)!
    • Eat – Moab has a number of cute cafes and small restaurants you can try. Our trip was a few years ago now, but I’ve done my best to remember where we went and what we thought of each place:
      • The Blu Pig – pretty sure we went here and got takeout. I remember it being pretty good if you are into BBQ.
      • Sunset Grill – this was a super neat spot we went to on our ‘fancy’ night. It’s definitely a little finer dining than some of the other spots in town. It sits up in a mountain in what used to be the home of the “founder” of Moab. It’s a really neat story that you can learn about the place and it has really amazing views of the mountains. Definitely a nice place to go if you’re celebrating something or want a nice evening out.
      • Eklectica Coffee & Collectibles – we had breakfast here one day and stopped for coffee another day. It’s a tiny place, but the food is good and organic and they also have cute stuff for sale in the cafe.
      • Quesadilla Mobilla – this is a food truck that has a semi-permanent location set up with some outdoor tables and chairs. We had delicious burritos here on the day we did some walking and shopping around town.
      • Moab Coffee Roasters – we got delicious iced coffee here one day when we were walking about town. It was a great treat on a VERY hot day.

Definitely a great trip all around. There is a TON to do depending on what you want. We didn’t even really explore options for canyoneering, rafting or anything like that, but there are plenty of choices if that’s what your looking for. If I can offer you any final tip – plan ahead. In the spring / summer months, tours, rentals and lodging book up, so you need to reserve your spot early. Otherwise, you may get there and find yourself with nothing planned and no way to get in on the action.

 

Gift Ideas: Vodka Soaked Chocolate Covered Strawberries and BONUS: Chocolate Covered Strawberry Martinis

As you may know, Christmas 2018 was a handcrafted Christmas. Some of the gifts I made were more family-friendly (like the homemade board game) and others were more geared toward the adults (like the Awkward Cat Calendar). As such, there were a few instances where I needed (well, wanted) a small gift for either the adults or kids in the family.

For my brother and his wife, they live across the world and are only home every 3 years. This can make gift giving tricky because I can’t do any of my obvious DIY gifts for the home since it’d be really hard for them to take back with them. So, I opted for a “disposal” gift – vodka soaked chocolate covered strawberries. First, who DOESN’T love chocolate covered strawberries, and more importantly, who doesn’t love a little booze in their dessert? I know I do.

This was a really simple recipe. Here’s what you need:

  • Chocolate flavored vodka – I used Van Gogh Dutch chocolate infused vodka; any kind will do, but this was oddly one of only 2 brands available in a chocolate vodka at my local grocery store (pic below)
  • Strawberries
  • Melting chocolate – lots of people will tell you to get the special wafers that are meant for melting; they aren’t wrong, but I prefer the taste of milk or dark chocolate, so I tend to get regular chocolate chips or chocolate squares, melt it and then cut it with a TINY bit of coconut oil to thin it up so it’s easier to dip
  • Coconut oil (optional, see note above)
  • Wax paper
  • A cute tin or tupperware for storing the strawberries

These are DEAD EASY to make:

  1. Soak the strawberries in the vodka overnight. I put them in a glass container laid out side by side (so the strawberries didn’t get any soft spots) and poured about 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch of vodka into the dish.
  2. Remove the strawberries from the vodka and dry thoroughly. Don’t SQUEEZE them (you don’t want to lose the infusion), but you do need them to be dry to the touch if you’re going to get the chocolate to stick.
  3. Melt your chocolate and cut with a tiny bit of coconut oil (if using) to thin to a nice, dippable consistency. I have a little chocolate melting pot, but you can use a double boiler or pot of boiling water with another pot with the chocolate in it sitting down in the water. Try to avoid just microwaving the chocolate if you can – it’s really easy to burn. Also, microwaved chocolate tends to cool more quickly, making the last strawberries that you dip a little ugly…
  4. Dip strawberries in the chocolate and place onto wax paper to dry. Put into the fridge to speed up the cooling process.
  5. Arrange in a decorative tin or “treet” yourself!

TIP: Save the strawberry infused chocolate vodka! A few days later I made really yummy dairy free chocolate covered strawberry martinis that I adapted from this recipe. Instead, I used the following:

  • Chocolate syrup – to line the glass; just get crazy and drizzle it all in there
  • Strawberry infused chocolate vodka (from above) – I used 1.5 oz. per drink
  • Pinnacle Whipped Vodka – I used 1.5 oz. per drink
  • Sweet Creme coconut creamer – I used 1.5 oz. per drink
  • Ice
  • Blended strawberries

Put the vodka, cream and ice into a shaker and mix well. Pour into a chocolate syrup lined martini glass and top with a glob of pureed strawberries. Stir them in just a little bit and serve!

Gift Ideas: Reversible Drawstring Toy Bag

As with many of my recent posts, this was another item from Handcrafted Christmas 2018. I made this for my SIL, as she has two boys (3 and 1.5 and one more baby on the way!) so figured easy toy clean up and transportation is definitely something important to her.

The original idea for this gift (and subsequently, this post), came from a number of my fellow pinners on Pinterest. I looked at pictures to get some inspiration, but ultimately sorted out how to made this step by step on my own, so here’s what I did.

Materials:

  • 2 yards of soft, flannel fabric in two patterns (1 yard of each) – you don’t have to use flannel, but this gave the bag a really nice feel, so I opted to; it also makes the bag feel a bit more durable
  • Liquid stitch – you could also hand sew or use a sewing machine to make this bag. Since I didn’t have a sewing machine at the time (though I’ve since gotten one, thanks, MIL!) and I didn’t particularly feel like hand sewing it, I opted to use liquid stitch and it worked great
  • Grommets & kit – by “kit,” I mean the tool to install the grommets (see below pics for what mine looked like); I used this set
  • Something sharp to punch your grommet holes – the hubs had this random tool (see below pic) that I used that did a nice job of punching the hole, but you honestly just need something sharp to get the hole started
  • Super glue – I used this to keep the holes from fraying and expanding and opted for the brush-on super glue, which was helpful to keep it clean without getting my fingers stuck to anything!
  • Hammer and a small piece of scrap wood– if needed, to install the grommets
  • Rope – I used a dark blue paracord; get the appropriate size to fit through your grommets; I got mine at Wal-mart
  • Drawstring piece – this is completely optional – the bag works completely well without this part, but I just used one from an old coat; you can also get them on Amazon
  • A marker and scissors – to trace onto the fabric and then cut out your desired shape

Instructions:

  • First, I cut my fabric into circles. To do this, I flipped the fabric over and found a large, circular object (the bottom of my custom cat stratcher) and traced the circle on both pieces of fabric. Then I cut it out. It doesn’t have to be perfectly cut / edged as you will not see the rough cut edges once the bag is finished. Be sure to trace the circle on the back of the fabric.
  • Then, I took both pieces of fabric and put them face to face (ie, the sides of each that I wanted to show on the outside were facing each other with the opposite sides facing out). I used my liquid stitch to glue around the edge of the circle to bind the two pieces together. Be careful to stay as close to the edge as possible and make sure to leave a little bit unglued so you can turn the fabric inside out (so the right sides of the fabric are facing outward and the rough edges are hidden in the seams).

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  • Once you flip the pieces inside out so the right sides are facing outward, carefully finish folding the seam and glue the two flaps together. Your final seam should look like this.

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  • Next, poke your holes for your grommets and fit the larger piece through the hole. Use your super glue around the hole / rim of the grommet to prevent the fabric from fraying.

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  • Finish the grommets by taking the other piece (the smaller part that looks like a washer) and fitting over the cylinder piece. Use your grommet tool and hammer to fit it into place and finish the grommet. I watched this video before doing my own grommets and it helped.
  • Finish the bag by threading the rope through the grommets. I choose a “middle” to the bag and threaded the rope from there around both sides rather than feeding it through all the grommets starting at one end and working back around the circle. Once the rope is threaded through all the holes (and long enough for the bag to be fully laid out as the circle), cinch the bag closed and put your drawstring piece on to hold the bag closed. If you decide not to use the drawstring piece, you can just tie a loose bow knot at the top of your bag.

I decided to finish my bag by putting some cute little toys inside for my nephews. This helps with the bag presentation (makes the bag shape a little better) and also demonstrates the purpose of the bag for the receiver. Tada!

Gift Ideas: Custom Board Game

A lot of people have asked me where I came up with this idea for handcrafted Christmas / why I decided to do this and I, unfortunately, don’t have a great answer. I can’t really remember! So, regardless of the catalyst, I decided to make a custom board game for one of my nephews. He is turning 7 this month, so he is reading and starting to become aware of his surroundings, including his neighborhood.

As a kid, I was always a fan of the Game of Life, but could rarely get anyone to play it all the way through with me. As I got older, I found the game Mall Madness and LOVED it, so when trying to come up with the premise for this game, I decided to marry the two to create: My Actual Neighborhood (the hubs picked the title).

Here’s how I did it:

  • Create the game premise. Before you start designing a board or anything else, it’s important to have a plan for how the game will be played. That way, you’ll know what the board should look like and what pieces, cards and other materials you’ll need. I decided that I wanted to include pictures of his neighborhood, so, for the gameplay, each player would draw a card that would give them a “mission” for the game. This “mission” would include 3 places on the board that they’d have to go to in order to win. I then created cute little scenarios to accompany each combination of locations. For example, one scenario was: You’re having a sleepover with your cousins at Grandma’s. Start at home and pack your bag. Then, go pick up your cousins from their house. Lose a turn at their house because they aren’t ready. Finally, head to Grandma’s for a night of fun. Other scenarios require the player to go buy something (like craft supplies for a gift for mom or dad), for which they must first earn money. In order to earn money, they can either complete chores at any of the locations (each location has a corresponding chore and payment amount) OR they can get lucky and land on a board space that pays them (for losing a tooth, having a birthday, etc.). I outlined all of this FIRST so I could think through how to design the board and what other pieces I’d need to create.
  • Design the board. My next step was to draw out what I wanted the board to look like. I did this on paper first and really started by thinking about the locations I wanted to include (I included 6: his house, his school, our house, another aunt & uncle’s house, houses of his grandparents on either side and his mom’s work, which is Wal-mart, so it worked out for a few of the missions) and where they exist in relation to one another. My original sketch was pretty tough to follow, so I added color and it looked like this:

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Note, I added the park as somewhat of an afterthought because I had a lot of dead space and I also wanted a neutral location for all players to start. The same is true with the Community pool (I had a few extra blocks I didn’t know what to do with).

  • Create the board. Next, I transferred my design concept onto the actual board. I wanted to get an understanding of the sizing of each space / the board overall so I could create the other pieces to scale. Since my original design was on a letter-sized sheet of paper, I wanted to try to scale it so I wouldn’t have to rework all the spacing. My final sizing was roughly 4:1 (just under) with the fold down the middle of the board. This required a little math to convert onto the board, but I just counted the number of spaces I needed vertically and horizontally and then divided the length and width dimensions of the game board accordingly to create evenly sized spaces. The materials I used to create the board included:
    • Tri-fold board from the Dollar Tree – I used one side flap and part of the main board piece to create a board that had a pre-built fold down the middle.
    • Exacto knife and cutting mat – I used this to cut the top and side to get the size I wanted. It’s really hard to cut straight, so a metal ruler would have been incredibly helpful for this part, but I didn’t have one so I free-handed it (after making line markings, of course).
    • Ruler and pencil – for measuring and marking everything; as mentioned, if you have a metal ruler, even better as this will help you with cutting too!
    • Calculator or brain – to do math
  • Add board details. Once I had the basic layout of spaces, I went back through and added pictures of each location and other board accents. For the pictures, I printed them out at home on plain computer paper and used double stick tape to attach them. I decided to include arrows on each space to indicate which way a player could move (like how roads work). I also added stoplight symbols on some spaces and location markers on others; more about what these mean below. To finish the game board, I applied a thin layer of mod podge to the bottom. I decided against applying a layer on the top because I was worried it would prevent it from folding nicely and/or would make the colors run.
  • Create your supplemental materials. Now that the board was done, I needed to create everything else to go along with it. The supplies I used (referenced below as well) included: paper cutter (super helpful for getting straight cuts!), stamp pads in red and blue, letter stamps and a location symbol stamp, number stickers (Dollar Tree), colored dot stickers, printer and a few colors of paper. Note, the preview / google docs version of some of the below templates don’t display correctly. For best results, download and open with Microsoft Word.
    • Money – I looked at pictures online of board game money to get an idea (and also based this off of the style of American money since that’d be familiar for my nephew). You can see my money template here.
    • Mission cards – I used Microsoft word to create 4 cards per page and wrote out each mission using a numbered list. I made sure to keep the formatting consistent so each card would be the same size. Then, on the back, I used stickers and stamps to label each as “Mission” with a number (so they can switch up what mission number they have each time they play). I made a total of 10 missions. You can see my template here. 
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    • Stoplight cards – as I mentioned, I drew little stoplight symbols on the board with marker, so I needed cards to go along with them to indicate what they mean. Each stoplight card had some sort of driving-related incident – a speeding ticket, out of windshield washer fluid, ran out of gas, etc. If the player lands on the space, they must draw a card and then either pay the fine (if they’ve earned money) or lose a turn. Again, I used Microsoft Word; you can see my template here. I printed these on colored paper to distinguish them from the mission cards. For the back, I used colored dots to make the little stoplight symbol.
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    • Location symbol cards – these are like bonuses throughout the game. If you land on a space with a location symbol, you’d draw a card and earn money for some reason (babysitting your cousins, helping an elderly person carry their groceries, picking up your neighbor’s dog’s poop, etc.). I used a different color of paper for these and used a location symbol stamp to mark the backs. My template (Microsoft Word) is here.
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    • Instruction sheet – definitely don’t forget this! You can see my template here. I laminated it after printing just because I love laminating.
    • Location Chore Payment Card – as mentioned, if the player needed to earn money to make a purchase, he or she could choose to visit an additional location and lose a turn to earn some cash. I created this little guide here to indicate how much money would be earned at each location.
  • Make the game pieces. Thankfully, my husband got a 3D printer for Christmas in 2017. I don’t have any great recommendations for you on how to create pieces without one (maybe find random knick-knacks around your house that you could include? Maybe make little cardboard people or stands?), but here’s the pieces we used from Thingiverse:

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  • Make the game box. I found a really helpful blog about how to make a board game box here. My husband was adamant that he didn’t want to just use a clothing gift box, so I followed the instructions using a couple of boxes I received some shipments (Amazon, Wal-mart, etc.) to create a custom-sized box. Then, I covered the entire thing with thing brown paper (from my massive roll I’ve used for all my gift wrapping). I used mod podge to adhere the brown paper to the cardboard. Then, I printed out pictures of all the locations on the game board and a few others (his dad’s work, restaurants and stores they go to in their area, the mall, a park, etc.) and used these to cover the top and sides of the top piece for the box. I used mod podge to adhere the pictures to the box and then applied a thin layer of mod podge on top as well to give it a shiny finish and protect it. I also made sure to include the name of the game right in the middle.

 

Once I had everything done, I used baggies and a little box we had laying around to keep the cards, money and game pieces organized. Here’s the final product:

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3D Unicorn Cake

I’m guessing it’s the sheer ridiculousness of the title that drew you into this post, right? I cannot claim any of the magic that you’re about to see as my own – only (most of) the words are from me. The rest is the great and fabulous talent of a very good friend of mine, heretofore referred to as HC. (Yes, there’s a story. No, I’m not going to tell it. Count your blessings.)

HC has a niece who was turning 5 this year. For whatever reason (what DOES go on in the minds of children?), her niece requested a black unicorn cake with a fairy perched on the tip of the horn. Ummmmm. Okay. Let’s break that down.

  1. A unicorn cake, in its own right, is hard enough on its own, especially if we’re talking 3D. You have to make multiple layers to give it dimension and then, of course, you have to figure out a way to mount the horn and add detail on a…vertical surface.
  2. A black cake is also incredibly tough. Black isn’t a color that’s easy to make with frosting and fondant can be a pain in the butt.
  3. A fairy perched on anything other than the cake is just absolute madness and also…a fairy…with a unicorn? I guess they are both mythical…

Anyway, despite having all the odds stacked against her, she created this gloriousness:

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Here’s how she did it.

Materials:

  • 3 boxes of cake mix (any kind or flavor will do)
  • Wilton mini cake pans (6″ and 8″)
  • Wilton frosting recipe ingredients (enough for 4 batches)
  • Fondant (she used both white and black fondant)
  • Cake board (10″ should be good)
  • Gel frosting dye (she used the Wilton neon dyes)
  • Wilton Color Mist (it’s a spray can – pic below)
  • Frosting bags and tips
  • Dowel rods (food-safe)
  • Straws
  • Fondant smoother
  • Pizza cutter (to cut fondant)
  • Fondant glue
  • Flower foam (optional – this may or may not work for you)
  • Fairy, if desired

Instructions:

  • Take a deep breath. This is going to be a marathon, not a sprint.
  • Party day -2: Roll out the fondant for your appendages (so, in this instance, the white fondant).
    • Eyes / lashes: roll into thin, worm-like shapes. Mold together into eye curves with lashes toward the ends and let dry.
    • Ears: Cut the shapes out of white fondant and pinch from the back to make an ear shape. Option to put onto a stick to dry (this will make it easier to put into the cake).
    • Horn:  Roll out a long worm-like piece of fondant and wrap around a straw, leaving the top a bit unfinished so you can wrap around the fairy’s foot when you assemble. Let dry. Option to stand up in the flower foam to dry. (Note, this could cause the fondant to slide down the straw; you may be better off letting it dry on its side and accepting that one side may be slightly flattened.)
  • Party day -1: Make the cakes and let them cool.
    • HC made a total of 6 of each size in a couple of flavors that’d pair well together. Feel free to get super creative and dye the mix for the layers (so the inside will be as magical as the outside).
  • Party day: Make the frosting and stack the cakes, layering with frosting in between.
    • *TIP: Use a cake board so it’s easy to move the cakes once they’re together.
    • Create two cake stacks with dowel rods through the middle to help them keep their shape: one stack of 6″ cakes and the other of 8″ cakes. As you can see from the pics below, the 8″ cakes are stacked up to 6 and the 6″ cakes are stacked up to 5.
  • Paint your accent pieces (eyes / lashes, ears, horn) and let dry.
  • Roll out the fondant for the main cake body.
    • Cover the sides of the cake stacks in frosting to adhere to the fondant.
    • Drape the black fondant over the cakes, covering each cake stack separately.
    • Start smoothing the lower part of the fondant sides with getting it to stick as your primary objective. Smooth up. Focus on having one good side (the front).
    • Use the fondant smoother to smooth into place and the pizza cutter to trim the excess fondant away.
  • Apply fondant accents (eyes / lashes and ears). You will want to use a combination of fondant glue and frosting to get the eyes / lashes to stick since they are attaching to a vertical surface. You may need to use toothpicks or straws to keep the ears standing up. Insert the horn into the cake.
  • Apply piped frosting accents. To create a multi-color effect, put stripes of frosting down each side of the bag, twist off the top and then slide it all down toward the tip. Be sure to use the frosting to cover any imperfections / the insertion point for the horn / any support for the ears.
  • Depending on when you assemble and when your party starts, you can store in the freezer to keep the frosting from sliding until you’re ready to present it. Putting the frosting and/or cakes in the freezer to flash-freeze as you make the cake is also a good idea. Your hand heat will warm the frosting which could cause your various designs to lose their shape.

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  • IF YOU MUST transport, arrange a trustworthy passenger to hold it and don’t plan on going far.

I would say “that’s it” but….well…that was a lot. Good luck. Leave a comment below if you decide to attempt this crazy feat and god speed!