Thanksgiving Crafts for All

I love my mom, but one thing she is not is crafty. She can come up with crazy, fun ideas, but actually executing them is not her strong suit. The good news – she is incredibly self-aware on this point. So, that leaves the (Thanksgiving) crafts to me – hooray!

Every year at our Thanksgiving dinner, we take time to say what we’re grateful / thankful for. Sometimes, we get a little wild and do this through crafting. If you’re looking for a fun Thanksgiving craft good for most ages, I’ve got a couple of ideas to share:

  • Thankful Turkey Board – this was a bit of a twist on our normal ‘This year I’m thankful for…’. Rather than saying WHAT we were thankful for, we each drew two names of people at our celebration and wrote down something that we’re thankful for about that person. This was easy because it was all family, but this might be a little tougher if you’ve got a mixed group of family and friends or you have folks who bring a friend/date that no one has met before. The names were written on pre-cut ‘feathers’ and we wrote the thankful messages there too. Then, we read them off one by one and one person added the feathers to the turkey board. It was a really nice activity and left us with a cool final product!
    • Materials:
      • Foam board (Dollar Tree)
      • Wrapping paper (optional) – I covered my foam board with wrapping paper to give it a little somethin’ extra, but this definitely isn’t required
      • Red, orange, yellow, and brown paper to cut the feathers out (feel free to veer from the norm of traditional Thanksgiving colors)
      • Markers for writing the names / messages on the feathers
      • Scrap newspaper, padding, foam, or batting (something to stuff your turkey body)
      • Brown paper – you could use a brown paper bag, wrapping paper, or similar
      • Googly eyes or white paper to make the eyes
      • Pre-cut color letters (optional)
    • Instructions:
      • If you’re going to wrap your board with wrapping paper, do this first.
      • Then, build your turkey body. I cut out the general shape and then started by gluing around the edge of one half of the turkey. Then, I stuffed its body and glued around the other half. NOTE: before you start stuffing/gluing him, be sure to add your eyes (either googly eyes or white circles with a draw-on black dot for the pupil), beak (yellow-ish triangle with a rounded tip) and waddle (I drew this on with a red marker). These parts are MUCH hard to add after your turkey is on the board and fluffy.
      • Next, cut out a zillion feathers. Okay, okay, you don’t need a zillion. Last year we had 17 people at Thanksgiving and I needed two per person (each person drew 2 names), so I cut out 34 (plus a few extra just in case). I took my craft paper and folded it hamburger style and then drew a feather with the base at the folded edge and the side at one end of the paper. Then, I folded it accordion style so I could cut 10-12 feathers at once (5-6 folds x 2 since the paper is folded in half). You could also just draw one, cut it out and then use it as a stencil to draw and cut the rest, but this will take longer. (See below pics illustrating my method.)
      • Finally, write each person’s name on two feathers and add the letters to the top of your board. Firstly, you don’t have to add ANYTHING to the top, but I figured my mom would keep this and would want to remember when it was from, so I added the year. Secondly, as you can probably tell, only Thanksgiving is done in pre-cut letters. I hand-wrote 2017 on the board.
      • At your Thanksgiving celebration, have everyone draw two feathers and complete the activity before dinner. At the end of dinner (or whenever, really), have each person read theirs one by one and use a glue stick to paste them up on the board in a feathery way.

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  • Individual Thankful Turkeys – we’ll see how this goes tomorrow, but this year, we are making individual turkeys that have what we’re thankful for on them. This is a good craft if you have family/friends that are a little bit older / can handle some crafting (not great for young kids). All my nieces/nephews who will be at the dinner are 9+, so hopefully it works out!
    • Materials:
      • Used toilet paper rolls – I started collecting these about a month before, just to be safe. You need one per person attending + one extra for an example turkey.
      • Red, brown, yellow, orange, tan paper (or whatever color variation you want for your feathers)
      • Glue – liquid glue will work a bit better for this one
      • Pens/markers to write on the feathers and the TP rolls
      • Googly eyes – I got a big pack at the Dollar Tree for $1, but you could also just draw eyes onto your turkey
    • Prep Instructions:
      • Similar to the above, make your feathers. I had 5 colors of paper, so I made 5 feathers for each person. We have a slightly lighter crew this year (only 14), so I made a total of ~80 (5 p/p, plus the example + some spares)
      • For this craft, you also need to make enough beaks and waddles for each person. For both, I used the same feather / folding approach. I drew one waddle and folded my paper a bunch and then cut it out (so I could get several waddles in one shot). The beaks were super easy as I just cut squares that can be folded in half to create a triangle beak + triangle that can be glued to the body.
      • Then, write at the bottom of each TP roll. You, of course, don’t have to write at the bottom, but I wanted it to be obvious what the turkeys were for, so I wrote ‘I’m thankful for…’ and then each person will write their thankful items on the feathers.
      • Finally, cut slits into the side of the TP roll directly across from one another; when the craft is put together, the fan of feathers will be slid into these slits to keep the feathers in place / upright.
      • That’s it for prepping the materials for this craft. Below are the instructions for actually DOING it, which you’ll need for your dinner guests and to assemble your sample turkey. At your dinner, provide your crafters with the materials (beaks, waddles, feathers, eyes, markers/pens, glue), the sample turkey and instructions.
    • Assembly Instructions:
      • Start by writing on your feathers. I chose 5 generic things one might be thankful for (think Family Feud top 5 answers on the board…).
      • Next, glue the bottom of the feathers together in a fan.
      • Then, glue on the eyes, beak and waddle. Fold the beak square in half and glue one triangle to the body with the other as the 3D beak. Glue the beak FIRST and then add the waddle. Remember, the top of the waddle goes on top of the beak, not below.
      • Finally, slide your feather fan into the slits on either side of the TP roll and examine your handiwork. It should look something like this…

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For other Thanksgiving related reading:

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