Thanksgiving Crafts for All

I love my mom, but one thing she is not is crafty. She can come up with crazy, fun ideas, but actually executing them is not her strong suit. The good news – she is incredibly self-aware on this point. So, that leaves the (Thanksgiving) crafts to me – hooray!

Every year at our Thanksgiving dinner, we take time to say what we’re grateful / thankful for. Sometimes, we get a little wild and do this through crafting. If you’re looking for a fun Thanksgiving craft good for most ages, I’ve got a couple of ideas to share:

  • Thankful Turkey Board – this was a bit of a twist on our normal ‘This year I’m thankful for…’. Rather than saying WHAT we were thankful for, we each drew two names of people at our celebration and wrote down something that we’re thankful for about that person. This was easy because it was all family, but this might be a little tougher if you’ve got a mixed group of family and friends or you have folks who bring a friend/date that no one has met before. The names were written on pre-cut ‘feathers’ and we wrote the thankful messages there too. Then, we read them off one by one and one person added the feathers to the turkey board. It was a really nice activity and left us with a cool final product!
    • Materials:
      • Foam board (Dollar Tree)
      • Wrapping paper (optional) – I covered my foam board with wrapping paper to give it a little somethin’ extra, but this definitely isn’t required
      • Red, orange, yellow, and brown paper to cut the feathers out (feel free to veer from the norm of traditional Thanksgiving colors)
      • Markers for writing the names / messages on the feathers
      • Scrap newspaper, padding, foam, or batting (something to stuff your turkey body)
      • Brown paper – you could use a brown paper bag, wrapping paper, or similar
      • Googly eyes or white paper to make the eyes
      • Pre-cut color letters (optional)
    • Instructions:
      • If you’re going to wrap your board with wrapping paper, do this first.
      • Then, build your turkey body. I cut out the general shape and then started by gluing around the edge of one half of the turkey. Then, I stuffed its body and glued around the other half. NOTE: before you start stuffing/gluing him, be sure to add your eyes (either googly eyes or white circles with a draw-on black dot for the pupil), beak (yellow-ish triangle with a rounded tip) and waddle (I drew this on with a red marker). These parts are MUCH hard to add after your turkey is on the board and fluffy.
      • Next, cut out a zillion feathers. Okay, okay, you don’t need a zillion. Last year we had 17 people at Thanksgiving and I needed two per person (each person drew 2 names), so I cut out 34 (plus a few extra just in case). I took my craft paper and folded it hamburger style and then drew a feather with the base at the folded edge and the side at one end of the paper. Then, I folded it accordion style so I could cut 10-12 feathers at once (5-6 folds x 2 since the paper is folded in half). You could also just draw one, cut it out and then use it as a stencil to draw and cut the rest, but this will take longer. (See below pics illustrating my method.)
      • Finally, write each person’s name on two feathers and add the letters to the top of your board. Firstly, you don’t have to add ANYTHING to the top, but I figured my mom would keep this and would want to remember when it was from, so I added the year. Secondly, as you can probably tell, only Thanksgiving is done in pre-cut letters. I hand-wrote 2017 on the board.
      • At your Thanksgiving celebration, have everyone draw two feathers and complete the activity before dinner. At the end of dinner (or whenever, really), have each person read theirs one by one and use a glue stick to paste them up on the board in a feathery way.

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  • Individual Thankful Turkeys – we’ll see how this goes tomorrow, but this year, we are making individual turkeys that have what we’re thankful for on them. This is a good craft if you have family/friends that are a little bit older / can handle some crafting (not great for young kids). All my nieces/nephews who will be at the dinner are 9+, so hopefully it works out!
    • Materials:
      • Used toilet paper rolls – I started collecting these about a month before, just to be safe. You need one per person attending + one extra for an example turkey.
      • Red, brown, yellow, orange, tan paper (or whatever color variation you want for your feathers)
      • Glue – liquid glue will work a bit better for this one
      • Pens/markers to write on the feathers and the TP rolls
      • Googly eyes – I got a big pack at the Dollar Tree for $1, but you could also just draw eyes onto your turkey
    • Prep Instructions:
      • Similar to the above, make your feathers. I had 5 colors of paper, so I made 5 feathers for each person. We have a slightly lighter crew this year (only 14), so I made a total of ~80 (5 p/p, plus the example + some spares)
      • For this craft, you also need to make enough beaks and waddles for each person. For both, I used the same feather / folding approach. I drew one waddle and folded my paper a bunch and then cut it out (so I could get several waddles in one shot). The beaks were super easy as I just cut squares that can be folded in half to create a triangle beak + triangle that can be glued to the body.
      • Then, write at the bottom of each TP roll. You, of course, don’t have to write at the bottom, but I wanted it to be obvious what the turkeys were for, so I wrote ‘I’m thankful for…’ and then each person will write their thankful items on the feathers.
      • Finally, cut slits into the side of the TP roll directly across from one another; when the craft is put together, the fan of feathers will be slid into these slits to keep the feathers in place / upright.
      • That’s it for prepping the materials for this craft. Below are the instructions for actually DOING it, which you’ll need for your dinner guests and to assemble your sample turkey. At your dinner, provide your crafters with the materials (beaks, waddles, feathers, eyes, markers/pens, glue), the sample turkey and instructions.
    • Assembly Instructions:
      • Start by writing on your feathers. I chose 5 generic things one might be thankful for (think Family Feud top 5 answers on the board…).
      • Next, glue the bottom of the feathers together in a fan.
      • Then, glue on the eyes, beak and waddle. Fold the beak square in half and glue one triangle to the body with the other as the 3D beak. Glue the beak FIRST and then add the waddle. Remember, the top of the waddle goes on top of the beak, not below.
      • Finally, slide your feather fan into the slits on either side of the TP roll and examine your handiwork. It should look something like this…

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For other Thanksgiving related reading:

Thanksgiving Food Fun

Whether you’re going somewhere for Thanksgiving or hosting the big event yourself, there are TONS of ideas out there for how to get creative with your food to increase the level of festivity. That said, nothing…and I mean NOTHING, should replace the focus on the core classic foods you have at your annual feast (in my opinion). But, if you’re looking for a way to spice up a side dish or have fun with dessert, below are a few ideas.

If you are hosting this year, be sure to check out my¬†Thanksgiving Crafts (for Hosting) and if you’re not, be sure to peruse Thanksgiving Crafts for All.

  • Turkey trays. This is 100% not how it sounds (it is not trays of turkey). It’s a great idea if you want to have raw fruits or veggies as an appetizer for your meal. My MIL often asks me to bring a side like this for our celebration at her house and, because I just can’t do anything normally, I’ve gotten creative for the past two years with layout. Last year, was a veggie turkey. This year was a fruit turkey.
    • Veggie turkey: veggie dip (I like to buy a ranch packet and sour cream and mix it up myself, but pre-made dip is equally great), a mini cucumber for the head with a pepper for the waddle, carrot for the lips and mini chocolate chips for the eyes + peppers, cucumbers, carrots, cherry tomatoes, and broccoli for the feathers / accents (feel free to use whatever veggies are most to your liking for the feathers – it doesn’t really matter as long as there is color variety)
    • 20171123_115551
    • Fruit turkey: Pear for the fruit body + a little chocolate frosting for the eyes (see Turkey brownie bites below for why I had chocolate frosting); grapes, mandarins, pears and kiwi for the feathers (you could use whatever fruit you want / whatever is in season – it was slightly slim pickins’ at the grocery)
    • 20181122_115932.jpg
  • Turkey brownie bites. If you’re tasked with bringing a dessert to your Thanksgiving dinner, why not spice it up (not literally) with some turkey-themed brownie bites! Below are the instructions:
    • Materials:
      • Boxed brownie mix (feel free to also make from scratch)
      • Chocolate frosting
      • Mini-cupcake tin liners (and a mini cupcake tin)
      • Candy corn OR peanut M&Ms (make sure you get the regular or fall colors – DO NOT get Christmas or your turkeys will look odd) – side note, my husband was not a fan of the candy corn option, hence the M&M replacement, but candy corn would make better feathers
      • Reese’s pieces
      • White chocolate M&Ms or Reese’s Pieces
    • Instructions:
      • Bake the brownies as directed in the mini-cupcake tin. Remove from oven and let cool until just warm.
      • Insert the tips of the candy corn or peanut M&Ms around one edge (just about half of the circle) so that a little over half of the candy is sticking up; these are your turkey feathers, so if you use M&Ms, vary the colors.
      • Add a dollop of chocolate frosting right in the middle and then insert an orange Reese’s pieces right into the middle of the frosting ball as the beak (put it in sideways so you can only see half of it sticking out).
      • Finally, add two white chocolate candy pieces as the eyes and put a small dot of chocolate frosting right in the middle.
      • Voila!

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Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours! I hope you have a wonderful time with your family, friends or with whomever you spend the holiday!

If you’re like me and love to get down with some Black Friday shopping, check out my Shopping Team Shirts post too!

Q4 Craftiness

Credit where credit is due – I saw a version of this on pinterest and have since created both a copy cat and bastardized version. This is a fun project to make for your own home, or for those of your loved ones. It’s a relatively simple project with just a few required materials (all of which are pretty cheap). And BONUS, it is a decoration for both fall AND winter. Gotta love a good 2-for-the-price-of-1.

Materials:

  • Wood pieces (for the Happy Fall / Let It Snow set, I used 2×4 boards cut into two 6″ sections, two 4″ sections and one 5″ section; for the Happy Autumn / Believe set, I used 2×2 boards cut into two 5″ sections, one 6″ section and five 4″ sections)
  • Sand paper
  • Paint (in whatever colors you want to use – I used primary colors only and mixed all the rest, like brown, orange, etc.)
  • Paint brushes & pallette or equivalent
  • Paint markers (optional) – I used a few paint markers throughout this project to make some of the letters easier; Specifically, I used paint markers for all of the Autumn / Believe letters and the black and silver on Snow

First, figure our your design. If you want to go with a different message, get creative with how to split the letters, how many blocks to use, and how to arrange the pieces. Then, cut all your boards and make sure they fit nicely together and are smoothly sanded. Since you’re creating a double sided decoration, you really need to make sure they’re evenly sanded on all sides.

After you’ve prepped the wood, cover all the blocks in white paint all the way around. This will give you a nice even base to start with and will ensure you have clean lines at the top, bottom and sides (especially if your wood has rounded corners). Once the white has dried, you can mix up your colors and paint the blocks accordingly. *TIP, try to pick something that goes with your house decor while still keeping in line with the holiday color scheme.

Finally, once you’re SURE that the paint has COMPLETELY dried (at least 24hrs), go back through and start to add the letters. If you’re using paint and a brush, I would recommend using a white colored pencil to sketch out your letters. This can also be a good idea even if you’re using paint markers. Then, let that dry and voila, a beautiful new, custom decoration for your house that will last you through ~6 months of the year, depending on where you live!

HappyFallLetItSnow

BelieveHappyAutumn